Synergy in Basic and Applied BSSR

Opiode addiction predictors.

Why do opioids put some people to sleep and do not seem to be addictive, while others easily succumb? Are there any genetic tasting relationships? Like cilantro can taste like soap to some people (who may be the sleepers), but it tastes good to other people who get easily addicted.

I do not want to do research on this myself. This is just an idea for research.

Idea No. 273

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Synergy in Basic and Applied BSSR

Intimate Partner Violence as a risk factor for depression among women of child bearing age in Southern Africa

The WHO (2016) and CDC (2014) have respectively identified Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) as an important public health problem globally. Prevalence rates of IPV reportedly vary geographically and by economic strata albeit with limited effective evidence based interventions in the USA per the United States Preventive Services Task Force( 2018). The situation is worse in some Low-Middle income countries (WHO). Studies... more »

Idea No. 274

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(@james.katz)

BSSR Resources, Methods, and Measures

Assessing Alignment of Thinking Between Health Professionals and Health Consumers

Medicine of the person recognizes that illness may be perceived as a threat. Illness is a threat that may undermine hope and that may force confrontation with mortal fears. Achieving the aim of clinical care that focuses on medicine of the person requires first and foremost the alignment of thinking among healthcare providers and the alignment of shared objectives between the healthcare provider and the patient. This... more »

Idea No. 281

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BSSR Resources, Methods, and Measures

Social predictors of treatment adherence in chronic disease

There has been growing recognition that adherence is a major barrier to effective treatment of long-term, chronic disease. This is particularly true for treatment regimens which are intensive, time-consuming and which must be completed indefinitely (e.g. treatment for cystic fibrosis, diabetes etc.). Many of these chronic illnesses have onset in childhood/adolescence. However, adherence can be a particular challenge during... more »

Idea No. 280

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(@maggie.morrisfears)

Synergy in Basic and Applied BSSR

Understanding the Impact of Adverse Childhood Events on Adult Diseases

Adverse Childhood Events (ACEs) have far reaching impacts on adult health, leading to an increase in addiction (drugs/alcohol), Type 2 Diabetes, Depression, etc. By addressing the reasons for the development of ACEs (e.g., food insecurity, unstable home life/trauma) and working to include education and coping skills, we might be able to shape the health of future generations. Addressing these issues is complicated,... more »

Idea No. 275

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Synergy in Basic and Applied BSSR

Global health and technologies

This is a general comment and not a topic of research. It seems that global health, especially in under-resourced settings, where high prevalence of disease and co-morbid conditions are often concentrated due to lack of capital and expertise, is missing. The same goes for the use of technology (mobile health, e-health, telehealth, wearables), which can in fact more effectively support the implementation of interventions... more »

Idea No. 278

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(@michaelbarris)

Adoption of Effective BSSR in Practice

Oliver Sacks as a model for communication of novel medical insights

Oliver Sacks, MB, ChB, (1933-2015) is a paradigmatic model for effective communication of novel medical insights. He produced a lifelong stream of popular and readable books, three of which were further developed as popular movies: 1) Awakenings, 2) The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, 3) At First Sight.

Idea No. 276

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